23 January, 2012

Keeping Track...

... of each other, generation to generation. I've written a LOT the last few days about cleaning out and the importance of documenting. My focus was on quilts and needlework, even though we think we'll remember what we've done, and when and why... we don't; it's important to label, and to give ourselves credit, if not for ourselves for those generations to come. Believe it or not, our quilts will outlive us!  When visiting Nova Scotia last fall we stopped at the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site in Baddeck. Before exploring this fascinating museum I was under the extremely limited delusion that he had just invented the telephone; boy, was I wrong! This gifted genius invented so many things and possessed a mind brimming with concepts, ideas and quotes. I photographed this genetic portrait chart there, realizing how important (and unique) a photo chart like this would be for my grandchildren; I hope to create something similar very soon. This past Saturday morning, as the grits were simmering on the stove, I browsed through my Google reader looking at new blog entries when I landed on Barbara Brackman's Civil War Quilts blog and a picture of a gorgeous quilt made by Dianne. I clicked on the site link and began to read, I couldn't believe what I was reading (or seeing) when my eyes landed on an actual block from 1865 bearing the name of a man from my own hometown. I am from a relatively small place (West Boxford, MA; made even smaller by the inclusion of "West" in the first position). Dianne was doing research, the blog post went on, to learn more about this individual. A quick phone call to my parents and one by them to a local historian (a childhood friend of my father's) revealed that the man in question was a distant relative by marriage to the historian himself. My mother called me back with his contact information which I promptly passed along to Dianne. As she stated in an e-mail response: "isn't the internet an interesting way to communicate and learn?" Yes, Dianne, it surely is! This was a timely "God wink" for sure, I rarely read through the aforementioned blog for content (I usually just look at the photos) and had I not on Saturday morning this information connection may not have ever happened. We have the  responsibility to keep track, not for us, but for those who follow; with a wealth of information at our fingertips, it's never been easier. 


Someone might just be looking 
for you tomorrow~ help them out.

Life is Good!

6 comments:

Janet O. said...

I love this. What is that saying, something like... "Coincidence is when God works a miracle and decides to remain anonymous."
Record keeping, documentation--both so important!

JCnNC said...

A genetic portrait chart is a fabulous idea. Think I will take the picture while I still look presentable. LoL Judy C

cityquilter said...

i didn't even know there was a WEST boxford, like it's that big? drove through more than once in a couple of minutes flat...so you're a yankee!

Salem Stitcher said...

You just gave me a great idea. as we lost another family member over the weekend, I began to worry even more about the loss of family history. My nephews will not know these wonderful folks I knew and adored growing up. I think a family chronicle is just what I need to do.

Thanks for the inspiration!

Ancestor Collector said...

Perfect post! I have had my family tree up on Genes Reunited for at least six years and never in all that time had I run across a Gansinger relation. But three months ago a woman emailed me because her grandmother was a Gansinger and we have begun a wonderful Internet dialog complete with photos being sent across the ocean from Scotland, and scanned records instantly appearing over there. Amazing. She and I, and now her cousin too, are second cousins, once-removed. And they are related to the Beacoms and the woman who contacted you from Australia 15 months ago about my blog post. Genealogy is such an incredible journey! I think it would be wonderful to create a family pictorial "directory" of sorts.

regan said...

I read your comment on Barbara's blog, and was hoping you would find out some more info on the gentleman. This IS a small world, isn't it!?!