13 February, 2019

Pressing Matters

I have had an affection for irons and ironing my entire life; here's all the photographic proof you need!😉 I can't even calculate how many irons I have owned, and worn out, in the last six+ decades, there are that many. In the sewing room right now I have my large "workhorse" steam generator iron, a full-sized regular iron that I can carry into other rooms, a portable iron for travel, an old-fashioned dry iron without steam holes for fusing and two, small, Clover irons for hand appliqué work. 

In any quilt class, workshop or gathering of quilters the "steam or no steam?" question is always a topic open for discussion. I am a huge steam aficionado; the more the better! I like for the seams in my quilt blocks to lie super-flat; there's no such thing as too much steam for me. My only advice to quilters who can't decide if they are in the "steam" or "no steam" camp is to take precautions to avoid stretching; always "press" (up and down) and not "iron" (push back and forth) and to be extremely careful not to handle a pressed and steamed block too quickly, let it cool in place on the ironing board!

I knew that my old-trusty Rowenta "Expert" steam generator was on it's last leg, it had been over-heating and was slowly falling apart, I had owned, and loved, it for approximately five years. I adapted and made concessions for its quirks and foibles as I knew that this particular model was no longer being made. I was well aware that our relationship was coming to a close, it was just a matter of time. And then, one fateful day, when I picked it up it literally fell apart in my hand! That was it. 
Sadly, I was forced to search for a new model, the day that I had long been dreading was upon me. I knew that I wanted another steam generator but wasn't sure which one. The prices for irons such as these range all over the place; one can literally spend as much as one has! Cost was important factor in my decision, I had a list of requirements and researched for hours. In the meantime I used the Rowenta Power Glide 2 pictured above. It works well, but it just wasn't quite the same. I need steam! steam! steam! 
After all of my research and reading as many reviews as I could find, I took a deep breath and settled on the Rowenta "Perfect Steam" model. Clearly, as I learned from the reviews, spending an exorbitant amount guaranteed absolutely nothing. My choice was definitely, what I would consider to be, mid-range in the cost department. It arrived on the doorstep two days later. So far, so good. We are developing a relationship and I am finding new features to love. This model has a removable water tank for filling (yes!) and a nicely designed tapered tip that makes ironing around buttons effortless. Yes, I iron more than quilt blocks!
The day after our recent vacation ended I was back at it, catching up on laundry. I am happily ironing away again with ease. It takes a while to fall in love again, but we're getting there. I receive no compensation from Rowenta, my experiences with their products are mine alone; keep in mind that this isn't a review but, rather, my own personal opinion based on what I like. Speaking of that, I did do some ironing while we were on the cruise ship. I didn't t take my own travel iron along, but used the one in the laundry room that was conveniently located just across the hall from our room. Mr. Goodneedle asked how I liked that iron. My response: "meh". He just smiled. Yeah, I know-- I suppose that I am an iron snob, I can own that. How about you? What do you need in an iron?

Life is Good! 

9 comments:

LizA. said...

I'm curious, what kind of water do you put in your iron? I'm also a steam girl but I got really tired of my iron spitting brown spots. After a lot of reading and research, I switched to a mix of distilled water and tap and the brown spots stopped. Last year my beloved Rowenta died after only 2 years. A lot of research led me to a Chi. It doesn't have as much steam but it stays on for 30 minutes before shutting off!!!!

Quiltdivajulie said...

I am with you all the way on steam - and I, too, iron more than quilt-related fabrics. I am currently using a mid-price-range Shark and we're getting along quite well. The older model (downstairs) is spitting more and more so will likely be replaced in the not-too-distant future. (and I use tap water in mine because the water here is that good - no distilled needed).

Elita@Busy Needle Quilting said...

I must admit that my mum is the one who loves to iron. I do not so my expectations are simple: Get Hot (ha!). I have a lovely Tefal that gets the job done and I tend to use a spray bottle of water instead of the steam feature. I've knocked or pulled it off the ironing station more than once and it still works so I can't complain.

cityquilter grace said...

good info....my latest iron purchase came with an auto shutoff...as i have a bad habit of walking away and getting sidetracked doing other things...not good in an apartment building...

Janet O. said...

My sister got the "love doing laundry and ironing" gene--I did not. I like a dry iron, and I use a spritz bottle or damp press cloth (depending on what I am pressing) if I need steam.
I like my iron to get really hot, and I like it to have some heft to it. :)

Panto Pam said...

I just purchased this same model and absolutely love it! Like you, I love flat seams and I love the fact that I don't have to wait for it to get hot again after the auto shutoff.

Lindah said...

I've been reading lots of good things about the steam generator irons. I must say that while I like my steam iron for laundry requirements, it just does not do quite so well on the seams. The little travel iron that I keep beside my machine is almost worthless on that score, too. What I reely would like to try out is one of those wool pressing mats. I've been hearing lots of good things about those, too. Of course, they cost as much as a steam iron, but still.

Susan S said...

I have two irons, a yellow Oliso that has the small legs that keep it off the ironing surface when not in use, and a Rowenta that I've had for many years. I have arthritis so the weight of both irons can be an issue with repeated use, so I prefer the Oliso. Lots of steam and heat, and the shutoff is 30 minutes so plenty of time to sew and press and sew and press. I bought a wool mat this year. It seems to help with the seams, sort of ironing from both sides at the same time. I haven't noticed a MAJOR amount of improvement, but whatever it is, I'll take it!

Shasta Matova said...

This is another time I wish you lived closer so you could iron for me! I hate ironing and generally add as many wrinkles as the ones I press away! I did get a new iron and a wool mat for the holiday, so I guess I am learning.